Posts tagged timeout

Timeout with Susanna Baird

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. To celebrate our fifth, we at Dribbble are sitting in the Timeout seat. Today: Susanna Baird.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

avatar I’m Susanna Baird from Salem, Massachusetts. I work half-time at Dribbble, writing and helping all of you amazing Meetup organizers. When not at Dribbble I write a lot, read a lot, mother a lot, and toil as a reluctant and barely acceptable housewife.

How’d you land at Dribbble?

When Rich and I moved to Salem in 2004, he informed me a celebrity named Dan Cederholm lived and worked in Salem. I said, “Yeah, a celebrity in your universe, maybe.” (Sorry Dan. I’ve now seen the way people throng around you at Meetups. Rich was right.) We met through our kids in 2006 and have been friends ever since.

Before kids, I wrote for magazines and newspapers. After kids, I picked up freelance gigs, including a yearlong stint with AOL News. In 2013 Dan and Rich asked if I’d like to do a little writing for them. I kicked off with a series about Irish designers, then launched the Weekly Replay, and the job grew from there.

What are you working on?

We recently launched a series called Moonlighting, about designers who spend a significant amount of time on non-design pursuits. I have several Spaced pieces in the works. (Teaser: Hoodlums and a hip music venue in Spokane). A new “Design For ______” series will kick off this fall, exploring design considerations and approaches for particular industries (e.g. education, nonprofit, professional sports, wine, comic books).

I’m a writer, through-and-through. When I go to an art museum, I head straight for the little blurb next to the picture, then step back and take a look. Instead of trying to write for Dribbble as the design expert I’m not, I approach Dribbble as a community full of interesting people who design. With the blog, I want to create a regional lifestyle magazine, wherein Dribbble is the region and the many, many varieties of design being practiced are the lifestyle. That last sentence only partially makes sense, but hopefully you get what I’m saying.

On the Meetup side, with the help of our sponsor Shopify, we (you!) hosted 50 Meetups in 12 countries the first half of this year and I got to attend my first (thank you, Raizlabs!). We just launched a partnership with the National Poster Retrospecticus, whereby we view their shows as atypical Meetups, a chance for you to gather in a new way while supporting a great effort and taking in some exceptional poster art.

We’re always looking for creative ways to bring Dribbblers togethers, so if you have ideas, please send me a note.

Tell us about your setup.

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I use a MacBook Air, two Gameplan Notebooks, and a blue Bic pen, medium point. I have yet to pimp my desk, so will share a photo of my favorite office feature: our gable-end fanlight. (I didn’t know it was called a gable-end fanlight until I wrote the first Spaced.)

The fanlight looks out over Derby Square, home of the Salem Farmers’ Market and to a recent political rally, which Dan and Rich and I watched from three stories up while standing on the arms and back of the couch under the fanlight.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Every time I ask a Timeout subject to answer this question, they moan and groan. “Don’t make us pick just one!” they whine. Now I get it. Whine.

I’m going to pick three.

Grandpa

Looking at Lea Vervoort’s Grandpa makes me remember what it felt like to be young and at the same time, anticipate what it feels like to be old. I’m 43 and I often want to fly away. In 40 years, I’m hoping for wings.

20140630--moonbase--concpets1-dribbble2

Axel Hermann’s Project on the Moon WIP is an education. Not only is he showing me how he’s working, he’s made an effort to explain in his comments. I love when you all do this.

Self-Slides from my talk

When I started working for Dribbble, I never expected to feel part of the community, but I do. I’m lucky because my two jobs, writing about you and helping you coordinate Meetups, allow me to interact with you in a positive way. You all are really nice to me, and a lot of you crack me up. (Making me laugh is the fastest way to my heart.)

Most recently, I had a great time working with Keith Frankel, Richie Stewart, and Kirk Wallace on Creative Mornings Boston. Kirk’s recent participation in a Meetup Playoff, during which he printed out his Dribbble avatar and taped it to the Analog Playoff form, made me laugh. Here is Kirk, as imagined by Kirk, for a talk by Kirk, with slides by Kirk.

(Commercial Break: Richie is speaking at the next Creative Mornings Boston, coming up next Friday. Go, Boston, Go!)

Find Susanna at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at susannabaird.com.

Timeout with Rich Thornett

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Rich-front-streetI’m Rich Thornett, co-founder of Dribbble. I do a little of everything at Dribbble these days - product design, code reviews, coding (when I’m lucky), hiring, support, and trash removal to name a few. For better or for worse (don’t ask my team which), I have a hand in almost everything that goes on over here. It can be exhausting, but product ownership is my thing and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

I live in Salem, Massachusetts with my wonderful, witty wife, where we spend most of our time corralling our children who are lost-in-bonkers. In my my spare time, I like to run and pun and spend far too much time playing and reading about basketball.

What are you working on?

It feels like I’m working on 14 different things at the moment. (And all moments.) Most recently, I’ve invested a lot of time improving our support, hiring, and working toward a new version of the Dribbble API. There are also bigger efforts for Teams and something we call Playbook that are just getting underway.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

D2

I’m not sure I have a favorite shot, but I’ll go with Mo’ Better Views. (Internally we called this D2, short for Dribbble 2. My git branch name was rt-d2 and, yes, I’m proud of that. PUN INTENDED!)

It’s a preview of filters that we added to some of our primary pages to enable more fine-grained shot browsing. It was one of those big, visible changes to the site that always scare the hell out of me. On release, you hope you don’t break anything and wait with bated breath to see how folks react on Twitter about the redesign. It involved a lot of thought, refactoring and fine-tuning of queries, as we were touching hallowed pages that had been around for some time. But primarily, I picked it because it was big first step toward a more flexible browsing experience that we’re after. I love big features that pave ground and stake territory toward a better future Dribbble.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

My setup is very simple - I use a 15” MacBook Pro. I never use an external monitor. It prevents me from moving around easily (I go from desk to sofa and back regularly, as well as often wandering over to show Dan what I’m working on.

The tools I rely on are GitHub, Sublime Text 2, Chrome, nvALT and Snappy. We use lots of open source to build Dribbble, but Ruby, Rails, and PostgreSQL are the core of our operation.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Since I’ve been on the Dribbble scene for a while, I tend to look at shots in the context of Dribbble history as well as their own merits. (There are just too many good shots to pick from if I don’t.)

In 2010, we ran a Veer Rebound Playoff. That was our first sponsored Playoff and it showed us that we could do advertising on the site in a way that was genuinely fun and interesting for members. We didn’t have any paid offerings at the time, so the revenue from that event was oxygen for us as bootstrappers. (We’re so grateful for folks like Veer, Media Temple, Campaign Monitor, MailChimp and others who kept us afloat in the early days by advertising with us. Thank you!)

The absurdly talented Dave Mottram was selected by Veer as the winner for And the bbband played on… (below). (Dave is amazing and, yes, I’m trying to get an extra shot in here. :)

Shot_1286507817

For my favorite shot, I’m choosing Ticket Stub by Ryan Putnam.

Shot_1286435597

Ryan’s entry received the most likes from the community and became the most-liked shot in Dribbble history at the time. Personally, I love the orange and blue, the vintage look of the ticket, and the way he worked the ‘bbb’ theme of the contest and Dribbble’s basketball motif into the shot.

Ryan would go on to win the Squarespace Rebound Playoff in 2012 and has been prolific in sharing his amazing work on Dribbble, which he now does as a member of the Dropbox design team. I feel honored that the history of his incredible work is linked in some small way to that of our company.

How did you get to Dribbble?

The better question is probably how Dribbble got to me. Dan and I both live in Salem and happened to meet and become friends when we both had kids around the same time. He let me share his office on days that I worked from home and our shop talk eventually turned to doing a side project together. He wanted to call the site we were building Dribbble (as in, leaking your work) and make it purple. One of those things actually happened.

To our surprise, our little side project drew more interest that we ever dreamed. As time went by, we scrambled each month to get some banner advertisers and eventually had just enough revenue for me to take a chance and quit my job to become Dribbble’s first full-time employee. As I write this, I realize I’ve now been self-employed for over 4 years. This was always a dream of mine and it actually happened. Thanks, Dribbble! #sniff

Find Rich at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at Thornett.com.

Timeout with Dan Cederholm

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. This week and next, to celebrate our fifth, we will sit in the Timeout seat. First up: Dan.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

DcHowdy, I’m Dan Cederholm, co-founder of Dribbble, designer, cautious adventure seeker, clawhammer banjo afficionado and lover of Muppets. I drive a Subaru and I’m a dad in real life. I’m likely eating a burrito right now. I hail from Salem, Massachusetts.

What are you working on?

Aside from HR duties and the general ebb and flow of running a small business, I’m also working on something we’re calling Playbook. It’ll be a simple, customizeable grid of your best work, powered by your Dribbble profile. I’m quite excited about it, and it’s been fun designing and coding something from the ground up, having less legacy than we’re usually dealing with on the main app. One of my favorite aspects of Dribbble is giving talented folks a platform for more visibility to connect with others, get hired, be a part of a great, supportive community, make friends, etc. And Playbook will be a nice extension of that ongoing goal of ours.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Electric

I’ll go with Electric Service Co. from two years ago. It reminds me of a time when I actually had time to make fun, seemingly useless things. And that it’s OK to create things just for the sake of creating something. Inspired from my walk from home to the office and the manhole covers stepped over along the way. I’d still love to print a variation of it on a T-shirt. Then again, I’d love to print most anything on a T-shirt. I dig the shot because it embodies a lot of what I love about designing things: real-life inspiration, a great typeface, warm colors, and simple forms. Plus, you can’t go wrong with a lightning bolt.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

I suppose it started with the iPhone camera, taking a photo of the manhole cover. I do all my vector work in Photoshop. I’m sure it’d be more efficient to use Illustrator, but for whatever reason I never learned it and have come to enjoy PS’s smaller toolset. Constraints and all that. For texture I probably used one of Liam McKay's excellent packs.

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Photo by Daniel Byrne for net magazine

For the past several years, I’ve been working exclusively on a 15” MacBook Pro. No external monitor, mouse or keyboard. It means working from comfy couches wherever and whenever, which is key when you’re raising two young kids. We have desks here at Dribbble HQ, but they’re rarely used.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Picture_6

Bull by Curtis Jinkins. Like many of you, I’m a big fan of Curtis’s work, and bought this print immediately after he posted the shot three years ago. It’s been happily hanging in my living room ever since. Curtis is a master of texture and simple shapes and custom lettering and other feats, and it’s been a joy following his work on Dribbble.

Find Dan at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at simplebits.com.

Timeout with Meg Robichaud

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Meg for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Meg4Ha. Well. I’m Meghan Robichaud, hailing from a small town (Hampton) on the east coast of Canada. I moved to Vancouver about 5 years ago, haven’t looked back. I’m a freelance illustrator/designer — lately leaning to the illustrator side — so “draw” does a pretty good job of summarizing what I do.

What are you working on?

Well, I’m just wrapping up a collaboration project for Aveeno that I’m really excited about. It’s the first time I have worked so closely with animators. I am utterly fascinated by the process, and loving being at the bottom of the learning curve for a while. Barring that, I’ve got a few quick projects—coupla’ mascots, logos & the like. And of course, I’ve always got a Quick Sprout guide on the go.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

  1. It's not rocket science..
  2. Lifepak
  3. We're on our way, Ellie.

I think I would have to say any of the Quick Sprout illustrations (you’ll know them from the mint background) that are particularly intricate: It’s not rocket science (above left), Lifepak (above center), We’re on our way Ellie (above right), Spacestuff, 80085 … to name a few. I love those ones just because they really capture when I get carried away. I know my client doesn’t care about the tiny details; I know it appears fairly small in the project; I know I have about 20184012 other things to get done today. I literally couldn’t stop. It’s too much fun.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

My desk looks a lot fancier than what I actually use. I’ve got an old MBP hooked up to a cinema display & my new MBPr hooked up to a Wacom tablet. You would think with all that screen space I’d have the spaces all rigged, every Adobe program with its own designated spot on the screens …

Nope. I pretty much exclusively use the big screen for music. It’s just the trusty MBPr, Wacom Intuos5 and Adobe Illustrator.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

  1. Vancouver_map_color_option__2
  2. Meteor
  3. Board de Dash

Oof. What a question. Can I just pick all of Scotty Reifsnyder’s shots? [Vancouver Map Color Option 2 above left.]

I think I’m going to go with Meteor by Nina Geometrieva (above center). I mean the colours and the shapes are stunning, and of course, it’s space: awesome. The reason it’s my favourite shot is because I spot people with it as their phone or desktop wallpaper all the time, and it’s like this awesome little badge: “Yeah I know you got that on Dribbble. Wanna stop whatever we’re doing and talk about Dribbble?”

Honorary mention: Board de Dash by Justin Mezzel (above right). The colours, and the lighting and the shapes … Goddamn. But I can’t pick it because we’re friends and that’s biased.

Find Meg at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at meg-draws.com.

Timeout with Von Glitschka

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Von for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Vonster2I refer to myself as an illustrative designer. My studio is in Salem, Oregon just south of Portlandia proper.

What are you working on?

Just finished branding a film house in the UK. Working on some linear line illustrations today.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

NEW Dungeons & Dragons Logo

Growing up I used to play D&D all the time so I was thrilled to design this new mark for Wizards of the Coast/Hasbro.

Not so thrilled Hasbro in-house applied Chrome filters to it on some iterations. But I digress.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

image

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I think my actual studio space would underwhelm most people. It’s very practical oriented to make managing many projects easy, keep my work station distinctly separate from where I draw out my designs, etc. But in my office you’ll find the following:

  • Pimped iMac i7 running a SSD HD
  • Drobo 5D
  • Sonos Play:5 (I like crooners and blues)
  • LightPad
  • Lots of pencils and pens
  • Wall of toy robots
  • Tiki collection
  • Old Jim Flora album covers
  • Lots of Star Trek collectibles (I’m a geek)
  • 2 iPads and 1 iPhone
  • My cat Snickers

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Dribble131

I’ve been enjoying the work of Luke Flowers lately. I love his latest Godzilla post (Godzilla Vs. Bada Kon Donk).

Find Von at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at Glitschka Studios.

Timeout with Melanie Richards

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Melanie for being today’s interviewee.

Melanie curates Badass Lady Creatives. We hopped on her bandwagon earlier this year, adding a Badass Lady Creatives section to the Weekly Replay. For her Timeout, we tacked on a sixth question so she could tell us more about the project.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Melanie RichardsI’m Melanie Richards, currently the senior web designer at Fuzzco in Charleston, SC. I mostly design and develop websites — thanks to a hobby I picked up when I was eleven-ish — but I also get to work on some fun branding projects at Fuzzco. Before Fuzzco, I was essentially a front-end web developer at Grooveshark, and studied graphic design at the University of Florida (fantastic program, would recommend). I run Badass Lady Creatives, a blog and directory which celebrates women working in the creative industries. I also keep a poetry and prose blog called Sedimentary.

What are you working on?

At Fuzzco, I’m working with a blend of local and national clients. Otherwise, I’m currently trying to step up my illustration game and explore some new styles. I have a few project ideas on deck — I am the queen of coming up with a kajillion projects and never doing them — including an illustration series on buildings in Charleston.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Melanierichards_justlove

Most of the shots on my personal Dribbble account are quick exercises, so this one is special because it was a really fun, slow labor of love. The shot is a crop from my poster for Joshua Krohn's The Just Love Project, and it features some of my favorite plants, along with some other little guys from around my neighborhood.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

My home workspace is pretty spartan. I’ve been terrible about hanging things up in this current house, so next I’ll be building some shallow shelves to display zines (which are way cooler than prints).

For this particular shot, I probably used the least efficient method possible: I gathered some references from life and the internet, then inked each plant over and over until I was satisfied with the shape. I used a size 2 brush, and the ink was Speedball India Ink. For a more opaque effect, I would use acrylic ink, but I really wanted this poster to feel more natural than graphic.

I scanned in the drawings, pieced them together in Photoshop, then used the Color Range tool to remove areas around the design. I half-toned the design so that the varying opacities would show up in the screen-printed poster, then erased any leftover speckles of paper texture.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

3rdselfie

I really, really love when Eileen Tjan does weird stuff. This is the third in a series of melty self-portraits that I find unsettling in a great way.

With Badass Lady Creatives, you’re entering the ongoing discussion about women in creative/tech by showing, rather than telling. Can you talk about the genesis of the site, and how it’s been received so far?

I started BALC in Spring 2013, when there were various bits of gender-based drama flying around the industry. For me, the discussion is bigger than gender: It’s really about making all people feel welcome in the design industry. It’s about sharing the limelight with the greatest variety of talented people; featuring awesome women is just one way to do that.

The project started as a Twitter/Pinterest-only thing. In December I launched the website and started writing a weekly column for Design Work Life. That was an accidental lean-startup way to do this project, and I’m so happy with how it worked out.

Reception has been awesome! I was nervous that people might think the site was silly or unnecessary. (I’m sure that opinion is out there quietly). Most encouraging to me is when someone is excited to hear they’ve been featured on the blog/directory. I’m the kind of person who is admittedly bolstered by strong feedback (both positive and negative), so to encourage someone else is very, very gratifying.

Find Melanie at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at melanie-richards.com.

Timeout with Allison House

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Allison for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

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What are you working on?

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Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

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2014-05-allison-house-volumetric-drive-by

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

image

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Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

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Iguana

Sherklor Hawlmes by Michael Rapa

Find Allison at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at Allison’s Tumblr.

Timeout with Mitch Blunt

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Mitch for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Mitch BluntHello! My name’s Mitch Blunt and I am an illustrator working predominantly for newspapers and magazines. I’m originally from Hastings, England (as in The Battle of) but currently my wife and I are living in Germany.

What are you working on?

At the moment I‘m currently working on a couple of longer projects which will be interesting because I’m lucky if I get longer than three days to work on something usually. I’ll also probably juggle some fast-paced jobs here and there to mix things up when I can.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Hanumandribbb

I chose this because it’s an example of an experiment that’s bringing a few different processes together and it reminds me to push myself creatively.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

image

My setup is probably quite typical. I have one standing desk for computer work and one drawing desk where I can make lots of mess. I’ve also been using more hand-drawn elements and found imagery in my work lately. This shot is a good example of that as I used my original drawing, some collage techniques and my computer to create it.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Seattle

This shot is by my friend Matt Hollister who is based in Seattle. All of his work is solid but this piece reminds me of when we hung out there last year and enjoyed some of his favourite spots.

Find Mitch at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at mitchblunt.com.

Timeout with Robert Padbury

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Robert for being this week’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Robert PadburyI am an Australian/American designer. I grew up in Melbourne, Australia, but for the last 10 years I’ve called San Francisco my home. I recently left Apple, where I was a designer working primarily on the iLife apps for Mac and iOS for 3 years. Prior to that, I had worked with startups like Stipple, DoubleTwist, Tapulous, Cooliris, Delicious Monster, and Gaia Interactive.

Typically I work on both visual and interactive components of software. I also do more traditional graphic design, such as identity work.

What are you working on?

Right now I run my own one-person design studio. Companies work with me to do anything from design strategy, identity design, as well as software design. I’m also collaborating with other designers on projects, which is very exciting. Currently I’m running a Kickstarter project for my minimalist Atelier Playing Cards, which has been incredibly successful so far.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Padbury Clock Screen Saver

My favorite shot is the Padbury Clock Screen Saver which marks the end of an almost two-year absence from Dribbble. I love this shot for many reasons. The biggest one is that its simplicity absolutely betrays the complex process of creating it.

I spent weeks obsessing over the typography and the different information I could include (at one point it included the day and date). When I finally had decided to use Helvetica Neue Ultralight, I didn’t like using the colon character as the time separator. I tried many different options until I finally decided to drop it all together. The result is just large, beautiful numbers.

Even for the accompanying website, I pushed myself to create a website that was as simple as the screensaver. There’s so much temptation to put share links, hashtags, icons, and all sorts of things on a webpage. It was incredibly difficult to just say “no,” and have the screensaver illustrated, and the text to download.

Although most people know me for my work on textures, 3D, and rendered objects, my original design style was geometric, rationalist, and minimalist. My “R” logo that I use as my avatar [see above] is a great example of this.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

The original screensaver was made with Quartz Composer. For the final shot, I created the computer and representation of the screensaver in Photoshop. Normally my tools and setup are a bit different. For sketching and idea creation, I use a Mont Blanc mechanical pencil and a Fabriano dotted grid A4 notepad. I also keep Field Notes notebooks on me at all times. Digitally, I’m on a 15” MacBook Pro with Retina Display with a Magic Mouse. I typically work in Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects, and Keynote. I also use some specialized software like Icon Slate, and Slicy for production.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Motion 4.0 App Icon

Motion Icon by Brian Frick. Brian’s work is incredible, and this icon is one of my favorites of all time. The concept is genius and the execution is sublime. His work, including this icon, inspired me to become an icon designer. Although this style is going out of fashion, I think this one in particular represents the highest form of artistry in icons.

Find Robert at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at www.padbury.me.

Timeout with Moran Goldstein

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thank you to Moran for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Moran Goldstein My name is Moran Goldstein, I’m a designer/developer from Israel. Over the past 15 years I’ve worked on physical product design, product/process visualizations, digital art, and pretty much anything that relates to 3D. These days I mostly work as a freelancer.

What are you working on?

Lately I’ve been fortunate to work on projects which combine design and development, like engineering animations and data-driven visualizations.

I have an ongoing “project” (loosely speaking) to develop methodologies and tools which allow taking engineering content (from software like SolidWorks, AutoCAD, and Inventor) and easily port it into 3D graphics software for animated visualizations and infographics. I find that many seemingly-complex processes and mechanisms can be easily understood if they are just presented correctly.

Recently I’ve also had the chance to work on sci-fi-related game content, which is enormously creative and freeing (since I’m designing gadgets that don’t actually have to work…).

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Clockwork

Probably Clockwork, in part because it’s fun to see people’s initial reaction to it. When I personally show it to someone they often ask if it’s an optical illusion — it’s not, the helical gears really do mesh and connect in a working fashion. If someone were to construct it, moving any one of the gears would make the other two rotate like in the animation.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

I’m a PC user, always have been. I like selecting the specific hardware that suites the job, and tweaking/optimizing my computers to get the most out of them. I use a very wide range of software. On the engineering side, I use Autodesk Inventor, AutoCAD, and SolidWorks. For 2D I use Inkscape, Illustrator, Gimp, and PaintShop Pro. Lately I create most non-precision 3D content in Blender, and render in Cycles. I also use KeyShot for some product rendering.

I actually have a couple of blowtorches. I love making things and working with metal. I also dabble in chemistry, so blowtorches come in handy.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

image

This one’s practically impossible, but I can mention one that stuck with me: Game of thrones. Blood and fire, by Sasha Vinogradova. Really his entire implementation of the house seals from Game of Thrones — he outdid the originals, by a significant margin.

Find Moran at Dribbble and at www.rapidflux.com.

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