Posts tagged timeout

Timeout with Fraser Davidson

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Fraser for being this week’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Fd I’m Fraser Davidson, co-founder of Cub Studio along with Ben Skinner. We are a small animation company based in London, UK. We create animated content for TV, the web and occasionally mobile.

What are you working on?

At any one time, we are working on 3-6 projects. Right now we are working with ESPN and the NFL on a couple of online animations due out this month. We are halfway through creating the graphics for the third series of BAFTA-Award-winning BBC show “The Revolution Will Be Televised” and creating a short explainer video for Raygun in New Zealand.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

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Right now, I think I like this test piece [POW!] for one of our upcoming pieces. We post a lot of test material on Dribbble as it’s a great way to test the waters and gauge reaction for an idea. We love looping.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

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This is not Fraser Davidson. This is Fraser Davidson’s dog, Molly.

We use mainly After Effects and Cinema 4D to create work. This is a very simple illustration brought to life in After Effects with a few simple animated shape layers and strokes.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Bikerdribbble

Going for a Spin by Latham Arnott

I really liked this piece from last month. It’s a fantastic loop. Extremely simple at first, but the more you look at it, the more lovely detail and clever secondary motion you see. It has great character.

Find Fraser at Dribbble, on Twitter, at www.fraserdavdison.co.uk, and at Cub Studio.

Timeout with Charlotte Smith

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Charlotte for being this week’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Smithy Hi! My name is Charlotte Smith, I’m an Irish-born graphic designer based in Paris. But hopefully, I will soon be moving to London. I studied type and lettering, then webdesign and quickly left that to the side. So for the past two years I have been working as a freelance graphic designer concentrating mostly on lettering and illustration.

What are you working on?

I’m lucky enough to regularly work for a french magazine called Paulette Magazine which has a very graphic approach. At the moment I’m working on the lettering for their summer issue cover, they never use ready-made fonts. I’m also working on a very exciting type project. I’ve been asked to create 6 to 7 different letterings that will go on a kids clothes line and that will be out this winter.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Icecream

Icecream. I’ve always been fascinated by paper art, and recently I gave it a go myself. I really enjoy dabbling at it in-between two projects. I was happy how the colours worked well together in this one. I have an obsession with pastel colours.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

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My desk is completely covered in type sketches, paper volumes, inks and pens, so I usually work in the sitting room. For this shot, I sketched up my templates on Illustrator, printed them and then cut them out on pastel paper before sticking them together. The hardest part is to take a picture of them. I’m useless with a camera, and have no mini-studio, so I have to make do with my kitchen corner, paper taped together and a sunny day.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

"Pool" fine art print on sale

Pool fine art print by Karolis Strautniekas. I’m in love with Karolis Strautniekas’s work. The atmosphere that she creates in each piece is beautiful, I find them very calming. The textures, details and simple colours in this piece are mind blowing.

Find Charlotte at Dribbble and at www.charlottesmith.fr.

Timeout with Balraj Chana

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Balraj for being this week’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

MeHey! My name is Balraj Chana and I’m a product designer and developer from London, UK. I have been freelancing for over a year and a half now and I specialise in UI/UX design for mobile and web. I also dabble in web development when needed.

Typically my client base hails from the Bay Area so I help startup founders bring their vision to life from mere sketches on a napkin to the app store.

What are you working on?

Currently I’m taking a break from client work to focus on my own personal projects whilst also travelling. To grow as a designer I need new experiences, which help me learn about different cultures and gain inspiration.

In terms of projects, as I’ve been in the design industry for a while I’ve seen problems that haven’t been solved yet so I’m attempting to solve them myself. One of these projects is called Hixle. It will be a tool specifically aimed at designers and developers looking to improve their productivity. More details to be unveiled in the near future :)

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

TinyLove Mobile App

Whoa, this one is tricky! If I had to choose one, I guess I would have to say that the TinyLove project is my favourite. This was actually my first app design for a wonderful client and it received high ratings from the app store on iOS and Android.

To me, it’s not just about the way it was designed but the concept behind it. The app allowed anyone to report incidents locally to help bring a community together. To be a part of that is why I became a designer in the first place. Even if the app only helps one person, it can create a ripple effect and that is why I want to help change the world through design.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

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My typical setup consists of a maxed-out Macbook Pro 15” Retina placed on a GhostStand with a Thunderbolt Display. I also have a wireless keyboard when I am stationary and a Logitech Performance MX mouse for pin-point pixel precision.

For software, I transition between various Adobe products including Photoshop for UI/web design, Illustrator for branding, After Effects for animations and LightRoom for photography. I also use 3ds Max for 3D rendering and Sublime Text for coding. For sketching concepts, a pencil and a Dot Grid notebook typically suffice.

Choose a favorite player. Tell us why you dig them.

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Whoa, this one is even trickier! There are so many awesome shots on Dribbble so I’ll nail it down to the shot that has affected me in some way or another. I’m usually attracted to designs which stand out as being different so this shot (Some Analytics) by Cosmin Capitanu does it for me. It has the perfect balance of futurism along with a strong color palette, well ahead of its time.

Find Balraj at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at CircularChaos.

Timeout with Paco

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Paco for being this week’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Paco007I’m Paco. My hometown is a scenic city named Ezhou, in the Hubei Province of China. Now my wife and I are living in Beijing. 

What are you working on?

I am working at Smartisan as the UI Design Director. In high school I began the training to be a professional graphic designer. Sketching is my strong point. Because of my great passion for design, after college I started my own career in UI.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Smartisan OS

Recently I completed a project named Smartisan OS which was custom designed for the Andriod system.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

My workplace demands are simple, all I need are an iMac and Razer Mamba. I have a good command of Photoshop. My daily working time is 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. from Monday to Friday.

The inspiration for new projects mostly starts with massive online research and open discussion with my team, then we choose some creative idea to start our design job.

Accept challenges. Sitting in your comfort zone won’t bring you anywhere. Learn new stuff and be proud of your small steps.

Choose a favorite player. Tell us why you dig them.

  1. Yosemite Finder
  2. Wireframe
  3. Instadamme

I like Daryl Ginn. His work always rstronginds me of something beautiful. Left to right: Yosemite Finder, Wireframe, Instadamme.

Find Paco at Dribbble and at www.weibo.com/pacoxiao.

Timeout with Elizabeth Barr

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. To celebrate our fifth, we at Dribbble are sitting in the Timeout seat. Today: Elizabeth.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

RedblueebI’m Elizabeth Barr — newbie front end developer, Dribbble support coach and mom. I’m originally from Buffalo, where I was a newspaper editor, and now live in beautiful Greenville, SC, a great little city that shows up on all sorts of lists of best places to live and play in the United States. And it has a cool tech scene that has come of age thanks to transplants attracted by Greenville’s great quality of life. I live here with my very tired restaurant-owning husband and an awesome 9-year-old. Once a month I volunteer at my daughter’s school, a fact that always makes me giggle and think, “Ten years ago, did you ever think you’d live in the South and serve BBQ to kids who call you ma’am?”

How’d you land at Dribbble?

Right after finishing a punishing, life-changing front-end developer course at The Iron Yard, an academy and accelerator here in Greenville (and campuses all over the South), I had the great pleasure to meet Rich. Rich is the husband of the greatest colleague I’ve ever worked with but never met, Susanna Baird. Susanna and I worked for AOL News from our respective kitchen tables (her in Salem, me in Greenville) before AOL bought The Huffington Post and we held our breath for two months as we waited to find out if we’d get to keep our jobs. (We didn’t! I can laugh about it now. Sort of. It wasn’t funny at the time, though, given that our husbands were each getting businesses off the ground. In a recession! Good times that I hope to never repeat.)

So this April, Rich and Susanna and their super cute kids swung through Greenville on their spring break. Not only did I get to finally meet Susanna in person, but I got to prattle on to a real-life tech company founder and use hard-won vocab words like “Grunt,” “Node” and “merge conflict.” I don’t think Rich was eager to talk shop on his vacation, but my enthusiasm must have made an impression, because shortly after he asked if I’d consider the support coach role while I continued working on freelance projects.

What are you working on?

At Dribbble, I respond to emails from people with questions, problems and suggestions; monitor Twitter for feedback of all sorts; write help documentation; and generally monitor the Dribbble community and assist where I can. I even opened a GitHub issue this week. (Though the public won’t see that new feature come to life as it’s in our admin.)

It’s an amazing opportunity to work for a company that has become ubiquitous in such a short time. On every resume, on every portfolio, of anyone in the digital realm are links to not only their LinkedIn and GitHub profiles but also Dribbble. In only five years Rich and Dan have done this.

When I’m not on the clock with Dribbble or ferrying my daughter to one sport or another, I create websites and apps for clients. Right now I’m working on a content-rich site for an area realtor that integrates four APIs. I can’t wait to see it live.

Tell us about your setup.

I work on 15-inch MacBook Pro, mostly at home but occasionally at a co-work space. I still don’t use an external monitor, probably because I haven’t settled in fully here or there. (I’ll probably co-work more when school starts back.) I’m seriously thinking of converting to a standing desk before sitting kills us all.

I try to take notes with pen and paper whenever possible since that’s the best way to learn and retain new material. But when I took my class earlier this year, I was confronted with just how bad my writing has become and how “out of shape” my handwriting muscles have become. Texting FTW, amirite LOL?

The tools I use most with Dribbble are Snappy, Basecamp and good old Twitter. In my superhero coding life, I use GitHub and Sublime Text 2 (and Atom) most often. I’m no longer scared of the terminal.

I’m Chrome only and get slightly indignant when I have to refactor code to accommodate other browsers. I have way too many tabs open, all the time.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Dribbble

So, so hard. I admire every designer, animator and illustrator who shares work because these are skills that don’t come easy to me. When I look at shots on Dribbble, I’m always eager for any info from the designer because I want to know how it was created. I want to know the tricks, the inspiration, why that color.

But when it comes down to it, I’m a sucker for gifs. They’re an amazing modern medium for communication. (Their ubiquity is matched only by Dribbble’s!) I can’t get through the day without sending at least a half-dozen. John Mayer would say they say what I mean to say. YKWIM?

Since gifs and pop culture are inextricably linked, this [All The Single Ladies by Fraser Davidson] is a shot that just tickles me. I love the way “Beyonce” backs it up.

Find Elizabeth at Dribbble and on Twitter.

Timeout with Susanna Baird

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. To celebrate our fifth, we at Dribbble are sitting in the Timeout seat. Today: Susanna Baird.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

avatar I’m Susanna Baird from Salem, Massachusetts. I work half-time at Dribbble, writing and helping all of you amazing Meetup organizers. When not at Dribbble I write a lot, read a lot, mother a lot, and toil as a reluctant and barely acceptable housewife.

How’d you land at Dribbble?

When Rich and I moved to Salem in 2004, he informed me a celebrity named Dan Cederholm lived and worked in Salem. I said, “Yeah, a celebrity in your universe, maybe.” (Sorry Dan. I’ve now seen the way people throng around you at Meetups. Rich was right.) We met through our kids in 2006 and have been friends ever since.

Before kids, I wrote for magazines and newspapers. After kids, I picked up freelance gigs, including a yearlong stint with AOL News. In 2013 Dan and Rich asked if I’d like to do a little writing for them. I kicked off with a series about Irish designers, then launched the Weekly Replay, and the job grew from there.

What are you working on?

We recently launched a series called Moonlighting, about designers who spend a significant amount of time on non-design pursuits. I have several Spaced pieces in the works. (Teaser: Hoodlums and a hip music venue in Spokane). A new “Design For ______” series will kick off this fall, exploring design considerations and approaches for particular industries (e.g. education, nonprofit, professional sports, wine, comic books).

I’m a writer, through-and-through. When I go to an art museum, I head straight for the little blurb next to the picture, then step back and take a look. Instead of trying to write for Dribbble as the design expert I’m not, I approach Dribbble as a community full of interesting people who design. With the blog, I want to create a regional lifestyle magazine, wherein Dribbble is the region and the many, many varieties of design being practiced are the lifestyle. That last sentence only partially makes sense, but hopefully you get what I’m saying.

On the Meetup side, with the help of our sponsor Shopify, we (you!) hosted 50 Meetups in 12 countries the first half of this year and I got to attend my first (thank you, Raizlabs!). We just launched a partnership with the National Poster Retrospecticus, whereby we view their shows as atypical Meetups, a chance for you to gather in a new way while supporting a great effort and taking in some exceptional poster art.

We’re always looking for creative ways to bring Dribbblers togethers, so if you have ideas, please send me a note.

Tell us about your setup.

image

I use a MacBook Air, two Gameplan Notebooks, and a blue Bic pen, medium point. I have yet to pimp my desk, so will share a photo of my favorite office feature: our gable-end fanlight. (I didn’t know it was called a gable-end fanlight until I wrote the first Spaced.)

The fanlight looks out over Derby Square, home of the Salem Farmers’ Market and to a recent political rally, which Dan and Rich and I watched from three stories up while standing on the arms and back of the couch under the fanlight.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Every time I ask a Timeout subject to answer this question, they moan and groan. “Don’t make us pick just one!” they whine. Now I get it. Whine.

I’m going to pick three.

Grandpa

Looking at Lea Vervoort’s Grandpa makes me remember what it felt like to be young and at the same time, anticipate what it feels like to be old. I’m 43 and I often want to fly away. In 40 years, I’m hoping for wings.

20140630--moonbase--concpets1-dribbble2

Axel Hermann’s Project on the Moon WIP is an education. Not only is he showing me how he’s working, he’s made an effort to explain in his comments. I love when you all do this.

Self-Slides from my talk

When I started working for Dribbble, I never expected to feel part of the community, but I do. I’m lucky because my two jobs, writing about you and helping you coordinate Meetups, allow me to interact with you in a positive way. You all are really nice to me, and a lot of you crack me up. (Making me laugh is the fastest way to my heart.)

Most recently, I had a great time working with Keith Frankel, Richie Stewart, and Kirk Wallace on Creative Mornings Boston. Kirk’s recent participation in a Meetup Playoff, during which he printed out his Dribbble avatar and taped it to the Analog Playoff form, made me laugh. Here is Kirk, as imagined by Kirk, for a talk by Kirk, with slides by Kirk.

(Commercial Break: Richie is speaking at the next Creative Mornings Boston, coming up next Friday. Go, Boston, Go!)

Find Susanna at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at susannabaird.com.

Timeout with Rich Thornett

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Rich-front-streetI’m Rich Thornett, co-founder of Dribbble. I do a little of everything at Dribbble these days - product design, code reviews, coding (when I’m lucky), hiring, support, and trash removal to name a few. For better or for worse (don’t ask my team which), I have a hand in almost everything that goes on over here. It can be exhausting, but product ownership is my thing and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

I live in Salem, Massachusetts with my wonderful, witty wife, where we spend most of our time corralling our children who are lost-in-bonkers. In my my spare time, I like to run and pun and spend far too much time playing and reading about basketball.

What are you working on?

It feels like I’m working on 14 different things at the moment. (And all moments.) Most recently, I’ve invested a lot of time improving our support, hiring, and working toward a new version of the Dribbble API. There are also bigger efforts for Teams and something we call Playbook that are just getting underway.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

D2

I’m not sure I have a favorite shot, but I’ll go with Mo’ Better Views. (Internally we called this D2, short for Dribbble 2. My git branch name was rt-d2 and, yes, I’m proud of that. PUN INTENDED!)

It’s a preview of filters that we added to some of our primary pages to enable more fine-grained shot browsing. It was one of those big, visible changes to the site that always scare the hell out of me. On release, you hope you don’t break anything and wait with bated breath to see how folks react on Twitter about the redesign. It involved a lot of thought, refactoring and fine-tuning of queries, as we were touching hallowed pages that had been around for some time. But primarily, I picked it because it was big first step toward a more flexible browsing experience that we’re after. I love big features that pave ground and stake territory toward a better future Dribbble.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

My setup is very simple - I use a 15” MacBook Pro. I never use an external monitor. It prevents me from moving around easily (I go from desk to sofa and back regularly, as well as often wandering over to show Dan what I’m working on.

The tools I rely on are GitHub, Sublime Text 2, Chrome, nvALT and Snappy. We use lots of open source to build Dribbble, but Ruby, Rails, and PostgreSQL are the core of our operation.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Since I’ve been on the Dribbble scene for a while, I tend to look at shots in the context of Dribbble history as well as their own merits. (There are just too many good shots to pick from if I don’t.)

In 2010, we ran a Veer Rebound Playoff. That was our first sponsored Playoff and it showed us that we could do advertising on the site in a way that was genuinely fun and interesting for members. We didn’t have any paid offerings at the time, so the revenue from that event was oxygen for us as bootstrappers. (We’re so grateful for folks like Veer, Media Temple, Campaign Monitor, MailChimp and others who kept us afloat in the early days by advertising with us. Thank you!)

The absurdly talented Dave Mottram was selected by Veer as the winner for And the bbband played on… (below). (Dave is amazing and, yes, I’m trying to get an extra shot in here. :)

Shot_1286507817

For my favorite shot, I’m choosing Ticket Stub by Ryan Putnam.

Shot_1286435597

Ryan’s entry received the most likes from the community and became the most-liked shot in Dribbble history at the time. Personally, I love the orange and blue, the vintage look of the ticket, and the way he worked the ‘bbb’ theme of the contest and Dribbble’s basketball motif into the shot.

Ryan would go on to win the Squarespace Rebound Playoff in 2012 and has been prolific in sharing his amazing work on Dribbble, which he now does as a member of the Dropbox design team. I feel honored that the history of his incredible work is linked in some small way to that of our company.

How did you get to Dribbble?

The better question is probably how Dribbble got to me. Dan and I both live in Salem and happened to meet and become friends when we both had kids around the same time. He let me share his office on days that I worked from home and our shop talk eventually turned to doing a side project together. He wanted to call the site we were building Dribbble (as in, leaking your work) and make it purple. One of those things actually happened.

To our surprise, our little side project drew more interest that we ever dreamed. As time went by, we scrambled each month to get some banner advertisers and eventually had just enough revenue for me to take a chance and quit my job to become Dribbble’s first full-time employee. As I write this, I realize I’ve now been self-employed for over 4 years. This was always a dream of mine and it actually happened. Thanks, Dribbble! #sniff

Find Rich at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at Thornett.com.

Timeout with Dan Cederholm

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. This week and next, to celebrate our fifth, we will sit in the Timeout seat. First up: Dan.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

DcHowdy, I’m Dan Cederholm, co-founder of Dribbble, designer, cautious adventure seeker, clawhammer banjo afficionado and lover of Muppets. I drive a Subaru and I’m a dad in real life. I’m likely eating a burrito right now. I hail from Salem, Massachusetts.

What are you working on?

Aside from HR duties and the general ebb and flow of running a small business, I’m also working on something we’re calling Playbook. It’ll be a simple, customizeable grid of your best work, powered by your Dribbble profile. I’m quite excited about it, and it’s been fun designing and coding something from the ground up, having less legacy than we’re usually dealing with on the main app. One of my favorite aspects of Dribbble is giving talented folks a platform for more visibility to connect with others, get hired, be a part of a great, supportive community, make friends, etc. And Playbook will be a nice extension of that ongoing goal of ours.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Electric

I’ll go with Electric Service Co. from two years ago. It reminds me of a time when I actually had time to make fun, seemingly useless things. And that it’s OK to create things just for the sake of creating something. Inspired from my walk from home to the office and the manhole covers stepped over along the way. I’d still love to print a variation of it on a T-shirt. Then again, I’d love to print most anything on a T-shirt. I dig the shot because it embodies a lot of what I love about designing things: real-life inspiration, a great typeface, warm colors, and simple forms. Plus, you can’t go wrong with a lightning bolt.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

I suppose it started with the iPhone camera, taking a photo of the manhole cover. I do all my vector work in Photoshop. I’m sure it’d be more efficient to use Illustrator, but for whatever reason I never learned it and have come to enjoy PS’s smaller toolset. Constraints and all that. For texture I probably used one of Liam McKay's excellent packs.

image

Photo by Daniel Byrne for net magazine

For the past several years, I’ve been working exclusively on a 15” MacBook Pro. No external monitor, mouse or keyboard. It means working from comfy couches wherever and whenever, which is key when you’re raising two young kids. We have desks here at Dribbble HQ, but they’re rarely used.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Picture_6

Bull by Curtis Jinkins. Like many of you, I’m a big fan of Curtis’s work, and bought this print immediately after he posted the shot three years ago. It’s been happily hanging in my living room ever since. Curtis is a master of texture and simple shapes and custom lettering and other feats, and it’s been a joy following his work on Dribbble.

Find Dan at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at simplebits.com.

Timeout with Meg Robichaud

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Meg for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Meg4Ha. Well. I’m Meghan Robichaud, hailing from a small town (Hampton) on the east coast of Canada. I moved to Vancouver about 5 years ago, haven’t looked back. I’m a freelance illustrator/designer — lately leaning to the illustrator side — so “draw” does a pretty good job of summarizing what I do.

What are you working on?

Well, I’m just wrapping up a collaboration project for Aveeno that I’m really excited about. It’s the first time I have worked so closely with animators. I am utterly fascinated by the process, and loving being at the bottom of the learning curve for a while. Barring that, I’ve got a few quick projects—coupla’ mascots, logos & the like. And of course, I’ve always got a Quick Sprout guide on the go.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

  1. It's not rocket science..
  2. Lifepak
  3. We're on our way, Ellie.

I think I would have to say any of the Quick Sprout illustrations (you’ll know them from the mint background) that are particularly intricate: It’s not rocket science (above left), Lifepak (above center), We’re on our way Ellie (above right), Spacestuff, 80085 … to name a few. I love those ones just because they really capture when I get carried away. I know my client doesn’t care about the tiny details; I know it appears fairly small in the project; I know I have about 20184012 other things to get done today. I literally couldn’t stop. It’s too much fun.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

My desk looks a lot fancier than what I actually use. I’ve got an old MBP hooked up to a cinema display & my new MBPr hooked up to a Wacom tablet. You would think with all that screen space I’d have the spaces all rigged, every Adobe program with its own designated spot on the screens …

Nope. I pretty much exclusively use the big screen for music. It’s just the trusty MBPr, Wacom Intuos5 and Adobe Illustrator.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

  1. Vancouver_map_color_option__2
  2. Meteor
  3. Board de Dash

Oof. What a question. Can I just pick all of Scotty Reifsnyder’s shots? [Vancouver Map Color Option 2 above left.]

I think I’m going to go with Meteor by Nina Geometrieva (above center). I mean the colours and the shapes are stunning, and of course, it’s space: awesome. The reason it’s my favourite shot is because I spot people with it as their phone or desktop wallpaper all the time, and it’s like this awesome little badge: “Yeah I know you got that on Dribbble. Wanna stop whatever we’re doing and talk about Dribbble?”

Honorary mention: Board de Dash by Justin Mezzel (above right). The colours, and the lighting and the shapes … Goddamn. But I can’t pick it because we’re friends and that’s biased.

Find Meg at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at meg-draws.com.

Timeout with Von Glitschka

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Von for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Vonster2I refer to myself as an illustrative designer. My studio is in Salem, Oregon just south of Portlandia proper.

What are you working on?

Just finished branding a film house in the UK. Working on some linear line illustrations today.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

NEW Dungeons & Dragons Logo

Growing up I used to play D&D all the time so I was thrilled to design this new mark for Wizards of the Coast/Hasbro.

Not so thrilled Hasbro in-house applied Chrome filters to it on some iterations. But I digress.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

image

image

image

I think my actual studio space would underwhelm most people. It’s very practical oriented to make managing many projects easy, keep my work station distinctly separate from where I draw out my designs, etc. But in my office you’ll find the following:

  • Pimped iMac i7 running a SSD HD
  • Drobo 5D
  • Sonos Play:5 (I like crooners and blues)
  • LightPad
  • Lots of pencils and pens
  • Wall of toy robots
  • Tiki collection
  • Old Jim Flora album covers
  • Lots of Star Trek collectibles (I’m a geek)
  • 2 iPads and 1 iPhone
  • My cat Snickers

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Dribble131

I’ve been enjoying the work of Luke Flowers lately. I love his latest Godzilla post (Godzilla Vs. Bada Kon Donk).

Find Von at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at Glitschka Studios.

older

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