Posts tagged timeout

Timeout with Meg Robichaud

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Meg for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Meg4Ha. Well. I’m Meghan Robichaud, hailing from a small town (Hampton) on the east coast of Canada. I moved to Vancouver about 5 years ago, haven’t looked back. I’m a freelance illustrator/designer — lately leaning to the illustrator side — so “draw” does a pretty good job of summarizing what I do.

What are you working on?

Well, I’m just wrapping up a collaboration project for Aveeno that I’m really excited about. It’s the first time I have worked so closely with animators. I am utterly fascinated by the process, and loving being at the bottom of the learning curve for a while. Barring that, I’ve got a few quick projects—coupla’ mascots, logos & the like. And of course, I’ve always got a Quick Sprout guide on the go.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

  1. It's not rocket science..
  2. Lifepak
  3. We're on our way, Ellie.

I think I would have to say any of the Quick Sprout illustrations (you’ll know them from the mint background) that are particularly intricate: It’s not rocket science (above left), Lifepak (above center), We’re on our way Ellie (above right), Spacestuff, 80085 … to name a few. I love those ones just because they really capture when I get carried away. I know my client doesn’t care about the tiny details; I know it appears fairly small in the project; I know I have about 20184012 other things to get done today. I literally couldn’t stop. It’s too much fun.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

My desk looks a lot fancier than what I actually use. I’ve got an old MBP hooked up to a cinema display & my new MBPr hooked up to a Wacom tablet. You would think with all that screen space I’d have the spaces all rigged, every Adobe program with its own designated spot on the screens …

Nope. I pretty much exclusively use the big screen for music. It’s just the trusty MBPr, Wacom Intuos5 and Adobe Illustrator.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

  1. Vancouver_map_color_option__2
  2. Meteor
  3. Board de Dash

Oof. What a question. Can I just pick all of Scotty Reifsnyder’s shots? [Vancouver Map Color Option 2 above left.]

I think I’m going to go with Meteor by Nina Geometrieva (above center). I mean the colours and the shapes are stunning, and of course, it’s space: awesome. The reason it’s my favourite shot is because I spot people with it as their phone or desktop wallpaper all the time, and it’s like this awesome little badge: “Yeah I know you got that on Dribbble. Wanna stop whatever we’re doing and talk about Dribbble?”

Honorary mention: Board de Dash by Justin Mezzel (above right). The colours, and the lighting and the shapes … Goddamn. But I can’t pick it because we’re friends and that’s biased.

Find Meg at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at meg-draws.com.

Timeout with Von Glitschka

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Von for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Vonster2I refer to myself as an illustrative designer. My studio is in Salem, Oregon just south of Portlandia proper.

What are you working on?

Just finished branding a film house in the UK. Working on some linear line illustrations today.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

NEW Dungeons & Dragons Logo

Growing up I used to play D&D all the time so I was thrilled to design this new mark for Wizards of the Coast/Hasbro.

Not so thrilled Hasbro in-house applied Chrome filters to it on some iterations. But I digress.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

image

image

image

I think my actual studio space would underwhelm most people. It’s very practical oriented to make managing many projects easy, keep my work station distinctly separate from where I draw out my designs, etc. But in my office you’ll find the following:

  • Pimped iMac i7 running a SSD HD
  • Drobo 5D
  • Sonos Play:5 (I like crooners and blues)
  • LightPad
  • Lots of pencils and pens
  • Wall of toy robots
  • Tiki collection
  • Old Jim Flora album covers
  • Lots of Star Trek collectibles (I’m a geek)
  • 2 iPads and 1 iPhone
  • My cat Snickers

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Dribble131

I’ve been enjoying the work of Luke Flowers lately. I love his latest Godzilla post (Godzilla Vs. Bada Kon Donk).

Find Von at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at Glitschka Studios.

Timeout with Melanie Richards

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Melanie for being today’s interviewee.

Melanie curates Badass Lady Creatives. We hopped on her bandwagon earlier this year, adding a Badass Lady Creatives section to the Weekly Replay. For her Timeout, we tacked on a sixth question so she could tell us more about the project.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Melanie RichardsI’m Melanie Richards, currently the senior web designer at Fuzzco in Charleston, SC. I mostly design and develop websites — thanks to a hobby I picked up when I was eleven-ish — but I also get to work on some fun branding projects at Fuzzco. Before Fuzzco, I was essentially a front-end web developer at Grooveshark, and studied graphic design at the University of Florida (fantastic program, would recommend). I run Badass Lady Creatives, a blog and directory which celebrates women working in the creative industries. I also keep a poetry and prose blog called Sedimentary.

What are you working on?

At Fuzzco, I’m working with a blend of local and national clients. Otherwise, I’m currently trying to step up my illustration game and explore some new styles. I have a few project ideas on deck — I am the queen of coming up with a kajillion projects and never doing them — including an illustration series on buildings in Charleston.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Melanierichards_justlove

Most of the shots on my personal Dribbble account are quick exercises, so this one is special because it was a really fun, slow labor of love. The shot is a crop from my poster for Joshua Krohn's The Just Love Project, and it features some of my favorite plants, along with some other little guys from around my neighborhood.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

My home workspace is pretty spartan. I’ve been terrible about hanging things up in this current house, so next I’ll be building some shallow shelves to display zines (which are way cooler than prints).

For this particular shot, I probably used the least efficient method possible: I gathered some references from life and the internet, then inked each plant over and over until I was satisfied with the shape. I used a size 2 brush, and the ink was Speedball India Ink. For a more opaque effect, I would use acrylic ink, but I really wanted this poster to feel more natural than graphic.

I scanned in the drawings, pieced them together in Photoshop, then used the Color Range tool to remove areas around the design. I half-toned the design so that the varying opacities would show up in the screen-printed poster, then erased any leftover speckles of paper texture.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

3rdselfie

I really, really love when Eileen Tjan does weird stuff. This is the third in a series of melty self-portraits that I find unsettling in a great way.

With Badass Lady Creatives, you’re entering the ongoing discussion about women in creative/tech by showing, rather than telling. Can you talk about the genesis of the site, and how it’s been received so far?

I started BALC in Spring 2013, when there were various bits of gender-based drama flying around the industry. For me, the discussion is bigger than gender: It’s really about making all people feel welcome in the design industry. It’s about sharing the limelight with the greatest variety of talented people; featuring awesome women is just one way to do that.

The project started as a Twitter/Pinterest-only thing. In December I launched the website and started writing a weekly column for Design Work Life. That was an accidental lean-startup way to do this project, and I’m so happy with how it worked out.

Reception has been awesome! I was nervous that people might think the site was silly or unnecessary. (I’m sure that opinion is out there quietly). Most encouraging to me is when someone is excited to hear they’ve been featured on the blog/directory. I’m the kind of person who is admittedly bolstered by strong feedback (both positive and negative), so to encourage someone else is very, very gratifying.

Find Melanie at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at melanie-richards.com.

Timeout with Allison House

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Allison for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

image

What are you working on?

image

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

image

2014-05-allison-house-volumetric-drive-by

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

image

image

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

image

Iguana

Sherklor Hawlmes by Michael Rapa

Find Allison at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at Allison’s Tumblr.

Timeout with Mitch Blunt

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Mitch for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Mitch BluntHello! My name’s Mitch Blunt and I am an illustrator working predominantly for newspapers and magazines. I’m originally from Hastings, England (as in The Battle of) but currently my wife and I are living in Germany.

What are you working on?

At the moment I‘m currently working on a couple of longer projects which will be interesting because I’m lucky if I get longer than three days to work on something usually. I’ll also probably juggle some fast-paced jobs here and there to mix things up when I can.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Hanumandribbb

I chose this because it’s an example of an experiment that’s bringing a few different processes together and it reminds me to push myself creatively.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

image

My setup is probably quite typical. I have one standing desk for computer work and one drawing desk where I can make lots of mess. I’ve also been using more hand-drawn elements and found imagery in my work lately. This shot is a good example of that as I used my original drawing, some collage techniques and my computer to create it.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Seattle

This shot is by my friend Matt Hollister who is based in Seattle. All of his work is solid but this piece reminds me of when we hung out there last year and enjoyed some of his favourite spots.

Find Mitch at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at mitchblunt.com.

Timeout with Robert Padbury

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Robert for being this week’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Robert PadburyI am an Australian/American designer. I grew up in Melbourne, Australia, but for the last 10 years I’ve called San Francisco my home. I recently left Apple, where I was a designer working primarily on the iLife apps for Mac and iOS for 3 years. Prior to that, I had worked with startups like Stipple, DoubleTwist, Tapulous, Cooliris, Delicious Monster, and Gaia Interactive.

Typically I work on both visual and interactive components of software. I also do more traditional graphic design, such as identity work.

What are you working on?

Right now I run my own one-person design studio. Companies work with me to do anything from design strategy, identity design, as well as software design. I’m also collaborating with other designers on projects, which is very exciting. Currently I’m running a Kickstarter project for my minimalist Atelier Playing Cards, which has been incredibly successful so far.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Padbury Clock Screen Saver

My favorite shot is the Padbury Clock Screen Saver which marks the end of an almost two-year absence from Dribbble. I love this shot for many reasons. The biggest one is that its simplicity absolutely betrays the complex process of creating it.

I spent weeks obsessing over the typography and the different information I could include (at one point it included the day and date). When I finally had decided to use Helvetica Neue Ultralight, I didn’t like using the colon character as the time separator. I tried many different options until I finally decided to drop it all together. The result is just large, beautiful numbers.

Even for the accompanying website, I pushed myself to create a website that was as simple as the screensaver. There’s so much temptation to put share links, hashtags, icons, and all sorts of things on a webpage. It was incredibly difficult to just say “no,” and have the screensaver illustrated, and the text to download.

Although most people know me for my work on textures, 3D, and rendered objects, my original design style was geometric, rationalist, and minimalist. My “R” logo that I use as my avatar [see above] is a great example of this.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

The original screensaver was made with Quartz Composer. For the final shot, I created the computer and representation of the screensaver in Photoshop. Normally my tools and setup are a bit different. For sketching and idea creation, I use a Mont Blanc mechanical pencil and a Fabriano dotted grid A4 notepad. I also keep Field Notes notebooks on me at all times. Digitally, I’m on a 15” MacBook Pro with Retina Display with a Magic Mouse. I typically work in Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects, and Keynote. I also use some specialized software like Icon Slate, and Slicy for production.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Motion 4.0 App Icon

Motion Icon by Brian Frick. Brian’s work is incredible, and this icon is one of my favorites of all time. The concept is genius and the execution is sublime. His work, including this icon, inspired me to become an icon designer. Although this style is going out of fashion, I think this one in particular represents the highest form of artistry in icons.

Find Robert at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at www.padbury.me.

Timeout with Moran Goldstein

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thank you to Moran for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Moran Goldstein My name is Moran Goldstein, I’m a designer/developer from Israel. Over the past 15 years I’ve worked on physical product design, product/process visualizations, digital art, and pretty much anything that relates to 3D. These days I mostly work as a freelancer.

What are you working on?

Lately I’ve been fortunate to work on projects which combine design and development, like engineering animations and data-driven visualizations.

I have an ongoing “project” (loosely speaking) to develop methodologies and tools which allow taking engineering content (from software like SolidWorks, AutoCAD, and Inventor) and easily port it into 3D graphics software for animated visualizations and infographics. I find that many seemingly-complex processes and mechanisms can be easily understood if they are just presented correctly.

Recently I’ve also had the chance to work on sci-fi-related game content, which is enormously creative and freeing (since I’m designing gadgets that don’t actually have to work…).

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Clockwork

Probably Clockwork, in part because it’s fun to see people’s initial reaction to it. When I personally show it to someone they often ask if it’s an optical illusion — it’s not, the helical gears really do mesh and connect in a working fashion. If someone were to construct it, moving any one of the gears would make the other two rotate like in the animation.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

I’m a PC user, always have been. I like selecting the specific hardware that suites the job, and tweaking/optimizing my computers to get the most out of them. I use a very wide range of software. On the engineering side, I use Autodesk Inventor, AutoCAD, and SolidWorks. For 2D I use Inkscape, Illustrator, Gimp, and PaintShop Pro. Lately I create most non-precision 3D content in Blender, and render in Cycles. I also use KeyShot for some product rendering.

I actually have a couple of blowtorches. I love making things and working with metal. I also dabble in chemistry, so blowtorches come in handy.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

image

This one’s practically impossible, but I can mention one that stuck with me: Game of thrones. Blood and fire, by Sasha Vinogradova. Really his entire implementation of the house seals from Game of Thrones — he outdid the originals, by a significant margin.

Find Moran at Dribbble and at www.rapidflux.com.

Timeout with Jeff Broderick

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Jeff for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Jeff BroderickMy name is Jeff Broderick and I am the Creative Director at a startup in San Francisco called ShopSavvy. I was born in Connecticut and moved to Dallas when I was about 9. As a child I had always wanted to be an architect for some reason. After getting to college I realized quickly that architecture isn’t my passion and product/design is my passion. I studied advertising and computer engineering at the University of North Texas and quit about three years in. After leaving college, I joined a marketing communications company in Dallas, where I spent most of my time learning, doing both design and development.

My career really took off when I moved to San Francisco in 2009-2010. I was able to spend 70-80 percent of my time designing while working with many startups like AppMakr, Swipely, SocialCam, and many more. After a couple years I became a partner in a small design agency working with companies like Adobe, BubbleBlitz, Redux and others. Then, finally, I settled down at ShopSavvy.

What are you working on?

I am currently working on iOS, Android and web designs for the new ShopSavvy. I’m also working on setting up a large, global hack-a-thon.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

image

Picking a favorite is quite hard. I am the type of guy who generally likes and am proud of just about everything I have worked on. I like pouring passion into my designs and giving them my all, so I am pretty attached to all of my designs.

This one [Asset Creation Process] is one of my favorites because I really enjoy sharing my process. I love learning how others work and finding ways to improve my own process to be a better designer.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

image

I have a spec-ed out 15” MacBook Pro with Retina display, though I am not a huge fan of it. At work, I plug into a Thunderbolt display and a 13” Wacom Cintiq. I am primarily in Photoshop but also frequent apps like Skala View, Slicy, Spotify, Tweetbot, and Sparrow. At home, I have a Thunderbolt display at my desk, but hardly use it. There is something nice about working on the couch, in front of the TV, with low pressure. :)

I have 2 pairs of AKG K 550 headphones for both home and work. I have tried so many headphones in my days and this is by far my favorite. I also have 2 Razer Mamba mice for both home and work. I have also tried so many different mice, and I have found that gaming mice have the best accuracy and the Mamba is a very simple/comfortable mouse with great accuracy.

… and of course my horrible addiction with Coke.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

image

This was probably more difficult than picking my one of my own favorite shots. I really only picked this one [Untitled iOS/iPhone synth app waveforms] because it’s one of my favorites from Mikael Eidenberg, but that guy is my hero. All of his work is simple yet very physical. I love the combination of real elements mixed with UI and I think he consistently balances it perfectly. I still think this is the direction UI will be going, a mixture of flat and physical items.

Find Jeff at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at brdrck.me.

Timeout with Mike/Creative Mints

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews, five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Thanks to Mike for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

Mike | Creative Mints Hey! My name is Mike. I live and work in Prague, Czech Republic. I’m a bit of a travel freak though, so you can bump into me in totally random towns and countries.

What are you working on?

My passion is website and app design but lately I’ve been spending a lot of time creating illustrations. I love diversity and I think that different types of design really complement each other. Look around and keep your mind open, you know.

At this very moment I’m busy designing a few really cool game apps, will surely show them to Dribbble folk soon!

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

image

OK that’s always a tough question. I guess if I had to pick one it would be this one Ui Kit (Metro). I see some synergy of my favorite design ideas here: cleanness, eye-catching colors, simple and intuitive structure and some unique feel. That’s what I strive for in all of my designs.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

image

My setup is fairly standard, no gimmicks here. Simple pen and paper, a camera, Copic markers, Faber Castell pencils. Oh well, I forgot this guy — Cintique24HD by Wacom, love it! The rest is pretty traditional, you can see my armory in many of my shots, I often take pictures of my workplace.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

image

Map pins — heart. I am a big fan of Eddie (Lobanovskiy) in general and I like how masterfully he can present even the simplest concepts. His shots are always different and he never rests on his laurels. Simply put, “like!”

Find Mike at Dribbble, on Twitter, and at Creative Mints.

Timeout with Brian Edward Miller

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews. Five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Many thanks to Brian for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

imageMy name is Brian Edward Miller and I’m the owner and illustrator behind Orlin Culture Shop. I was born and raised in Colorado and ventured off to California to attend Biola University, where I majored in graphic design and minored in Biblical studies.

After a 10+ year career in graphic and interactive design, my wife and I returned to Colorado and eventually launched Orlin Culture Shop, a venture I’d been itching to start for years. I now provide custom illustration services and on any given day can be found in my office drawing robots, magicians, mountain landscapes, sea monsters, and much more!

What are you working on?

I just finished up a number of Christmas illustrations for Adobe Inspire Magazine and GQ Magazine Germany, and am illustrating my first picture book for Penguin Publishing (due out in Summer 2014). I’m also writing and drawing my own book which I hope to have published next year.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

image

Choosing a favorite shot is difficult because I appreciate different aspects of every piece and they are each my answer to tough visual challenges. If I had to choose, I’d say either one of my Auto Shot illustrations.

These were the illustrations where I really found my voice as an illustrator and I’ve been amazed at the opportunities that have come through them. It really showed me the value of creating work I love and the power of sharing with online communities like Dribbble.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch)?

image

While a blowtorch would certainly feel more cathartic than my typical array of tools, my setup is much more mundane.

I typically start with rough sketches on paper using pencils and an assortment of inking tools (brushes, markers, basically anything that I have to mark black). From there I head to Photoshop where I’ll create the piece from start to finish using a Wacom Cintiq. For the Auto Shots illustrations, I worked 100 percent in Photoshop start to finish without preliminary paper sketches. I started with small color compositions and then moved to producing the final illustrations.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

image

For my favorite shot, I’ve chosen Josh Emrich’s Grimm Brothers Farmer’s Daughter Oktoberfest.

I am a huge fan of Josh’s work because he pours so much love, knowledge, and attention to detail into every aspect of his pieces. He’s a true craftsman and I find that level of artistic care and concern inspiring. He’s also the reason I began appreciating craft brews. I ended up buying a bunch of the beers he worked on and came to appreciate the brews as much as the labels.

Find Brian on Dribbble, on Twitter, and at Orlin Culture Shop.

older newer

About Dribbble

Dribbble is a community of designers sharing screenshots of their work, process, and projects. This is our official blog.

Dribbble Newsletter

Sign up for our newsletter to receive periodic news, updates, featured content, and more.

Dribbble Equipment

Threads and goods for designers like you. Official Dribbble shirts in our equipment shop.

Follow Dribbble

Dribbble Dribbble on Twitter Dribbble Meetups Dribbble on Instagram Dribbble on Facebook