Posts tagged timeout

Timeout with Jory Raphael

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews. Five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Many thanks to Jory for being today’s interviewee.

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Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

My name is Jory Raphael, and I’m a designer living and working in the beautiful state of Vermont. I have a lovely wife who is smarter than I’ll ever be and two kids who are following in her footsteps.

I run a small studio called Sensible World and design pretty much anything and everything, though I’m particulary fond of icons and logos. I’m also the guy responsible for all of the podcast artwork for 5by5 Broadcasting and the creator of Symbolicons, a lovely set of vector icons. 

What are you working on?

A lot! But the project I’m working on right now that makes me the proudest is Notabli, a startup I’ve co-founded with fellow Dribbbler and all-around nice guy Jackson Latka. I’m ridiculously excited about it. If you have young kids, you will be too. It’s a stylish and easy way for parents to chronicle and share moments in their kids’ lives. You can grab it on the App Store.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

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I’m really enjoying how the latest icon set I’m creating is turning out. My goal is to make them work well at small sizes and be super friendly. I have a special place in my heart for the projects that I’ve taken on outside of traditional client work. I think side projects are incredibly important to have, especially for creatives. I’m self-taught as a designer, and even more so as an icon designer. Each set I create is a learning experience, so it’s fun to try new styles and techniques without the pressure of a deadline.

Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot(s)? (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch, etc.)

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I recently relocated the HQ of Sensible World to Three West Collective, a co-working space in Burlington. It’s a great space and I’m surrounded by awesome designers and developers – which is a wonderful way to keep pushing yourself as a creative professional. I imagine my setup is fairly typical. 13” MacBook Air hooked to a cinema display. Mouse. Keyboard. Chair. Desk. William Shakespeare action figure. I have a similar setup at my home office (sans the William Shakespeare action figure). I live pretty much every day in Illustrator and Photoshop.

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Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

This is a tough one, as there are so many awesome shots to choose from on Dribbble, but one of my favorites would have to be the Vulture Badges by Matt Stevens. Matt is insanely talented and this project looked like a ton of fun. It’s the type of work I wish I could do, but doubt I’d have the skill to pull it off nearly as well as Matt did. Simple, iconic and well-executed.

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Timeout with Anna Paschenko

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews. Five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Many thanks to Anna for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

avatarHi! My name is Anna Paschenko. I was born in Krasnodar (South of Russia) where most of the year the sun shines and nowadays I guess that it’s inside me wherever I’m :) About 10 years ago I moved to Saint-Petersburg where studied at University of Culture and Arts. And currently I still stay here and work as a designer in software company.

What are you working on?

Apart from my daily job I’m always working on small personal projects like icons and illustrations. Every time I’m looking for something new, improving my skills and knowledge. Really love feeling that I move forward and seeing the difference between my old and current projects make me happy!

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Actually I love all my works and it’s quite difficult to distinguish them into favorite-categories :) But ok, let’s say that Clothespin is my favorite. I still enjoy this idea. Also it was an important experience working together with my friend and of course, the result exceeded all my expectations.

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Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot(s)? (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch, etc.)

I need minimum environment to do my work: iMac and Wacom that’s my creative factory :) The software I prefer are Photoshop and recent time i use Cinema4d, sometimes Illustrator but mostly as supplier program.

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Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

It’s yummy Sooshi! And of course it doesn’t mean if i’m russian and like caviar, I enjoy every shot with it :) That’s really amazing work. I’m excited about getsooshi project of Konstantin Datz and Moritz v.V. and hope in some time I’ll be able to make 3d works with the same fantastic quality.

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Timeout with Ingvard the Terrible

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews. Five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Many thanks to Ingvard for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

avatarMange hilsner! Many greetings! I am known among vikings, cowering villagers and art directors alike as “Ingvard the Terrible.” Also acceptable are “Lord Ingvard”, “Ingvard the Handsome” and, in some Latin American countries, “Los Pantelones Fuerte” (long story, don’t ask).

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From whence do I hail, you ask? Pretty much any village I feel like. As long as there’s gold to be plundered and beautiful womenfolk to expropriate! And a Chili’s.

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I was born the last of five mighty sons to a Danish mother and Swedish father. In addition to a youth spent honing my skills as a fearsome warrior and explorer of unknown lands, I also liked to draw a lot.

At first, my artistic endeavors consisted mostly of carving various and sundry runes and dragon motifs into the bones of my fallen enemies. Eventually, I grew interested in children’s literature, so naturally I toned down the blood and gore a bit.

Though I command a large and loyal crew of bloodthirsty warriors, I also render assistance from a small, but loyal band of thralls (slaves, basically; just Google it). Chief among them is a thirty-something, balding and vaguely useful man by the name of Mr. Ashby, who handles much of the trifling business details. And while Mr. Ashby has spent a number of years in the graphic design and illustration field, his talents pale miserably in comparison to his master’s, so it’s hardly worth mentioning. Enough about him….

Among my many influences are Thor, Cnut the Great, Sweyn Forkbeard, and Oprah. Yes, Oprah. Look, if you want lessons on conquering large swaths of other people’s domains and ruling over it with an iron fist, she’s your girl.

Artistically? Oh, uh, Berke Breathed, Bill Waterson, Gary Kelly, Derek Yaniger, Michael Slack, Ben Caldwell, Jon Flaming, Bill Brown, Looney Toons. Pixar inspires me not just visually, but in terms of developing great characters and compelling story lines. They also have a knack for dominating the box office, and ruthless domination, as you may have surmised, is a particular favorite pastime of mine.

My experience is vast and accolades many. I enjoy drawing, sailing the great northern seas, pillaging/plundering, pickled herring on crackers, and tall, frosty mugs of root beer.

What are you working on?

I am currently engaged in a number of different tasks: illustrating a handful of children’s eBooks; designing and illustrating invitation materials for one of my favorite clients; and developing a new line of high-end bear skin cloaks tough enough to withstand the most brutal northern winters, yet luxurious enough to say you’re a warrior who enjoys the finer things in life.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

A shot of mine and why it’s my favorite? Other than the fact that it’s mine? Ah. Well. I suppose I’d have to pick the one with Pippi Longstocking. Not necessarily for the shot itself, but because to this day the whole project is one of my absolute favorites. I never attached the full image to the shot for some reason (I assume copious amounts of aquavit were involved), so I’m including it here.

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Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot(s)? (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch, etc.)

The process of creating one of my illustrations is an intense and grueling one, certainly not for the faint of heart. Or the French. Once I receive an assignment, I immediately begin the ritual purification process: the day is spent alternating between sitting in the intense heat of a wooden sauna hut, and sprinting across the snow-covered hill and diving into a frozen lake. (During which I may or may not be accompanied by a handful of buxom, blonde Swedish ski instructors. While not crucial to such a ritual, it most certainly does not hurt.)

Once my mind and heart are clear, I summon the glorious, inspirational power of Odin, the Great Father of the Gods Himself to fall upon me. I also summon a pickled herring sandwich and a tall mug of root beer. Concepting makes me hungry.

Then, it’s time to sketch. No, before that, research. Lots of lots of research. I study the clothing styles, architecture, culture and so on relevant to the project at hand. Much time is spent at the foot of the alter of the Magnificent, All-Knowing Oracle known as “the Google.”

Okay, then I sketch. A lot. When I discover the look I want, I refine it, and once approved by the client, the real magic commences.

I searched for many years to find the right medium in which to work, experimenting with everything from acrylics to watercolor, colored pencils to pastels, pen and ink to the blood of my enemies… It wasn’t until I was browsing my local art supply store when I happened upon some scratchboard materials. Figuring it was one medium I had yet to try, I thought, what the Helheim. I instantly fell in love with it (strictly plutonic, however).

Originally I would create the base artwork on scratchboard, then scan it and add color and texture in Photoshop. Eventually, I created some custom brushes that recreate the same look, so now I do everything digital (except for sketching; some things are still best done by hand). The tools of my trade include a Wacom Intuos 4 tablet, an iMac, Adobe Photoshop and an assortment of fine cheeses.

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Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

This is a very difficult decision. Dribbble is oozing with incredible talent, so choosing a favorite is like only eating one item at a cheap Chinese buffet. Uh, perhaps this one:

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Level 02 02 by Nihad Nasupovic

I love the lighting, the strong sense of depth, the mood. No—wait, maybe this one:

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Nashville by Mary Kate McDevitt

I love the whimsical use of typography and color. Odin’s beard, I could go on and on. So much good stuff. Oh, and this one. Because it makes me giggle.

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OSX Smelly Cat by Ugur Akdemir

Timeout with Iris Atalay

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews. Five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Many thanks to Iris for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

avatarI am Iris Eda Atalay, 26 year old visual designer. I was born in the lovely city of Istanbul, Turkey and travelled all over Europe. I lived in Porto, Portugal for years. I actually studied fashion design in college, and used to work for companies like DIESEL, ZARA, and Desigual as an illustrator, but I ended up as a visual designer! 

I must say, joining Dribbble changed my life (in a good way). I get feedback from awesome and amazingly talented people all over the world, and I get to give feedback in return. It’s really great.

What are you working on?

Right now I am contracting with a startup called Colingo and being awesome! I am redesigning their product. It’s a lot of fun to be a part of a great team.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

My favorite one is Creamp3. Before that project, I hadn’t had the chance to design an iPhone app, but after I posted that shot, I got a lot of good feedback, work requests, and contacts for new projects!

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Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot(s)? (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch, etc.)

This is my current set up! I always have my Moleskine & some Sharpies in front of me for sketching and doodling. I have a 15-inch MacBook Pro hooked up to a generic HP monitor.

My Moleskine and mice (Magic Mouse for work, Razer Mouse for gaming, I do play SC and WOW [no life] ) are tools I can’t live without.

I mostly use Photoshop but lately I am trying to use Sketch app.

Oh, also I got one of those Dot Grid Book for wireframing! Love it! I use it for random sketching too.

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I also wanted to add my favorite helper’s photo! This is Becker. He is 2 years old and always sits next to me :)

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Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Oh I have a ton of favorite shots! I love this one a lot by Kerem SuerIt is creative, unique, simple and beautiful. Whenever I see his work I get inspired. He is one of the best!

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Timeout with Brian Hurst

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews. Five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Many thanks to Brian for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

avatarI’m Brian, a 29 year old designer and illustrator. Born and raised in Orange County, CA and currently living in Irvine with my wife of 1.4 years. I spend my days designing for Mariners Church, and my nights doing freelance and self-initiated projects under the moniker The Quiet Society.

What are you working on?

Lots of stuff, but the project I’m currently most excited about is a self-initiated children’s picture book I’m writing that will involve a lot fun illustrations of cities and stuff. Look for some dribbble shots early 2013.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

This started life as a little scratch paper sketch. Probably during a meeting or something. I liked it enough to keep sketching it over and over and turn it into this.

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Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot(s)? (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch, etc.)

At home my set up includes a Macbook Pro that’s probably running on borrowed time. I spend most of my time in Adobe Illustrator. Other tools include Rhodia notebooks, scratch paper, G2 Gel Pens (.38mm), Ticonderoga pencils, india ink and nibs, the occasional paint brush (for textures) and Canon scanner. Vintage desk lamp found in mother-in-law’s garage.

Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

I really like just about every shot I’ve seen from Levi McGranahan. The building shapes on this are delightfully odd. Plus the texture, colors and misregistered print look is spot on.

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Timeout with Jack Hughes

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews. Five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Many thanks to Jack for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

avatarHello! My name is Jack Hughes and I’m a (more or less) recent graduate from Kingston University London. I live in South London and was born here! I’m an illustrator, full time and freelancing. Thankfully I have not one but two agencies representing me, YCN in the UK and Agent Pekka Europe, which is nice.

What are you working on?

I’m the illustrator for Mr Hyde, the daily email service from ShortList, London’s largest circulated men’s lifestyle magazine. Mr Hyde aims to bring exactly that to an email, with features on where to eat meat in and around London, films to watch, gadgets to buy, galleries to visit, clothes to try etc. My illustrations have been a large part of the overall branding and each email features at least three. It’s been a nice on-going project that will see me working on into 2013 and perhaps beyond!

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

Although it’s a relatively old shot it definitely evokes a happy time. The Gentleman’s Guide to Cocktails was a career changing experience; a giant learning curve that I am forever grateful of. It was an awfully long project (around 4 months) but for the most part was largely enjoyable; I even got to work with an ex-tutor and good friend who was commissioned as the designer and art director.

Receiving it in the post with all my illustrations bundled up and packaged within a tidy, well designed book was so incredibly invigorating. Naturally I threw a cocktail party to celebrate, it wouldn’t be a total success unless I got disgustingly drunk, which I totally, totally did.

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Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot(s)? (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch, etc.)

Tools aren’t very varied; all I need is a sketchbook, a pencil, reference material and Photoshop. The type of illustration will govern how I start; if it’s a fashion illustration I’ll start in Photoshop, if it’s something more conceptual I’ll start in my sketchbook. Suppose I’m quite fortunate that I require so little space, as a result though I’m currently crammed into the prison cell-esque spare bedroom whilst my real bedroom is undergoing a makeover; depressingly it’s only half finished.

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Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Choosing just one turned out to be a lot more difficult than I thought it would, had to make a little shortlist, but managed to whittle it down to one. Wedding Cocktails by Jacob Etter, I’m an absolute sucker for simplicity, clever conceptual design, great colours and cocktails too!

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Timeout with Shaw Nielsen

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews. Five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Many thanks to Shaw for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

avatarI am a pretty snazzy illustrator with a knack for coming up with quirky solutions. I started off studying in San Francisco at the Academy of Art and eventually made my way back home to Denver, where I grew up. My work has been featured in Communication Arts, 3x3 magazine, on the cover of HOW Magazine, honored by the Alliance of Illustrators, and the Art Directors Club. It also still makes it on my mother’s fridge from time to time. The fact that I’m snazzy is not news to her.

What are you working on?

Oodles of things! I have a few editorial projects floating around right now, as well as some larger projects. Probably the biggest project I’m working on right now is some hall-o-ween displays for a large grocery store chain here in the US.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

On a professional level, my favorite shot so far has to be my shot of the cover I did for ‘How Magazine.’ HOW Mag is definitely at the forefront of design, so it truly was an honor to be asked to contribute.

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On a personal level, this one takes the cake currently because I enjoy bringing a bit of sunshine into peoples lives, instead of the doom and gloom that can so easily fill up our days if we let it.

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Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot(s)? (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch, etc.)

I always start off a project with oodles of doodling. It’s my favorite part of any project because the options are just so infinite at this point. So a sketchbook is always at the heart of my process. I burn through 2 or 3 of them in a month. I usually jump to the computer once the idea has been settled on and just start with a blank art board in Adobe Illustrator, referencing my sketch as I draw with my mouse. Next I’ll take my vector art into Adobe Photoshop and apply textures and tweak the illustration a bit to really bring the piece to life.

Though, on a philosophical level, taking a step back to drink a cold beer or to play fetch with my pup, is as much a part of my process as my pencil or computer. I just don’t think I could do the work I do without being happy and grounded by reminders of why I love living.

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Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Today my favorite shot is this amazing piece of portraiture by Richard Perez. Though, if you asked me tomorrow I’d have a different favorite. Dribbble is such a great source of inspiration.

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Timeout with Virginia Poltrack

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews. Five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Many thanks to Virginia for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

avatar Hi! My name is Virginia. I’m from Johnstown, PA which is a small town east of Pittsburgh. I have been drawing my whole life, and it’s something I’ve always loved. At night, at lunch, and pretty much any other free moment, I am drawing something, or planning what I’ll draw next.

What are you working on?

Right now, I’m working my way through some sketchbook drawings of the Star Wars characters. I am a huge Star Wars nerd! I try to draw something everyday, even if its just a quick sketch at lunch. My husband always says that my sketchbook is like my “security blanket” because I take it EVERYWHERE, and that’s very true. I just do my little drawings in my books. I go through a lot of sketchbooks!

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

favorite shot of mine would probably be my Han Solo sketch, just because I think that is a perfect example of my drawings.

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Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot(s)? (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch, etc.)

This will be probably the least technical workspace shot ever in the history of Dribbble, but that’s okay! It’s what I use! My tools include Micron pens, .005 and .01, HB through 6B lead, all kinds of paper, Copic markers, smudge sticks, erasers, glue, and an exacto knife. That’s for sketching, for work I use the Adobe Creative Suite, like Fireworks, Dreamweaver, Illustrator and Photoshop.

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Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

A favorite shot of mine…..lets see…well there are SO MANY talented people here, like Dave Mottram, Nick Slater, Troy Cummings, the list goes on. But a personal favorite is dog tag by Jolly Bureau

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Those guys are just amazing, and that is actually a painting of my little dachshund Sookie that they did for me. They are the sweetest, kindest people ever, and their work is just fantastic. That’s one of the reasons I love Dribbble, I have met the most amazing people through it. People that are always willing to offer advice, or to help, to offer support, you name it. I consider myself very lucky to be a part of this. I really do.

Timeout with Jeremy Holmes

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews. Five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Many thanks to Jeremy for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

avatarMy name is Jeremy Holmes (AKA “Sherlock, Home-Slice, Germy from Germany has Germs”). My family and I reside in the quaint little suburb of Philadelphia known as Glenside, PA (G-Side). I’m your run of the mill human who’s interests include storytelling, fatherhood and french fries. The majority of my day is spent searching for the perfect word or building the perfectly imperfect image that best tells a story (Children’s book author/illustrator). When I’m not building books for children, I’m changing their diapers, cooking them waffles and building their forts.

What are you working on?

Books, books and more books. I’m working on final art for a picture book titled “Poem-Mobiles,” by J. Patrick Lewis and Douglas Florian; sketches for book 2 of the “Templeton Twins,” by Ellis Weiner; final pencils for the chapter book “What I Found in the Sofa and How It Saved the World,” by Henry Clark.

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

This shot is a snippet from a picture book that I’ve been working on for over 2 years titled “Poemobiles,” by J. Patrick Lewis and Douglas Florian. This project has challenged every creative cell in my body and I love it for that. It also marks my return to my favorite medium, the pencil.

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Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot(s)? (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch, etc.)

To build an illustration for this book, I start with a tight (rather large) pencil drawing on vellum. From there, I scan in the drawing and begin adding color digitally (Photoshop). Once the color is in place, I create a few watercolor textures specific for the piece and digitally collage them onto the drawing. And that’s it x 100 hours.

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Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

Being a fan of all things odd and peculiar, this shot scratches my itch. If you haven’t checked out Caleb’s work, do so now… he’s one talented (slightly creepy) MoFo.

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Timeout with Vic Bell

Timeouts are lightning-quick interviews. Five questions to help you get to know the players holding court at Dribbble. Many thanks to Vic for being today’s interviewee.

Who are you? Let us know where you hail from and what you do.

avatarHello! My name is Vic Bell. I’m a freelance Illustrator, Iconographer and Designer. I’m from the UK, a true northern girl from a small town called Hartlepool. I’ve been illustrating since I was about 14l. After school I went onto study Design in college and Animation and Illustration at University in Newcaslte. I now reside in a small village close to Durham, I work from my little house surrounded by wildlife and countryside. I love it … even if it is freezing cold 360 days out of a year.

What are you working on?

I’m currently working on a few different projects, a lot of variation this month! A big one for me at the moment is a set I’m illustrating for Neon Mobb along side the awesome Rogie, which I’m really exited about. I’m trying to learn all I can on a daily basis from my bud Gav Elliot who I bug night and day on Skype for advice and feedback. Also working on some ace branding projects, a lot of awesome icon sets and a wicked info graphic illustration with Kyee. All in all it’s an exciting time for me! :)

Choose a favorite shot of yours. Tell us why it’s a favorite.

I have a few pieces I’m really proud of, mostly the work I did for Happiest. This time round though I’m going to have to choose this icon I made for my own website to link back to the store. The reason I choose this shot is because it’s so different to the work I usually do, I was so nervous about approaching an illustration icon that had no safety blanket of lifework. This said, I had so much fun with it and I’m hoping to find some time to play with more work like this in the new year, possibly some assets for a game … who knows!

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Tell us about your setup. What tools did you use to create the shot(s)? (e.g. hardware, software, pens, paper, blowtorch, etc.)

OK so I’m glad you asked! Because I’ve recently upgraded my whole desk area and wanted to show it off! I’m currently working on a 27inch iMac, unlike most illustrators I don’t use a graphics tablet, just a wicked Logitech mouse. I sketch on a Goldline A4 50gsm layout pad. I also keep a Dot Grid Book to hand for certain icon, logo and type concepts. Staedtler 0.7mm mechanical pencil and a few Copic brush markers for type concepts.

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Choose a favorite shot from another player. Tell us why you dig it.

This one is so tough, I think I’m going to go with Colin Hesterly's Road to Pixar piece. I love this so much! I’m a huge pixar fan so this was lovely to see, Colin’s style is something I refer to time and time again for inspiration. Awesome job dude!

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